King of Denmark

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I’ve been saving this cocktail recipe for a while, even though it contains Pernod.
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I don’t remember why I even have Pernod in my liquor cabinet, because I don’t like it. I drank it once in a village in Provence, while sitting on a rooftop watching the sun set. I managed to choke the stuff down because I felt I had to. I wanted that experience, like the times I choked down whiskey in Ireland and Scotland, and Grappa in Italy. But it was awful.

My mother was never much of a drinker for being French, but occasionally she would get out her Pernod, mix it with water, and enjoy it during the summer months. I could hardly get past the smell of the stuff – the pungent anise flavor.

Pernod Absinthe

Pernod Absinthe


So the recipe I’d saved, called the King of Denmark I discovered at BarNoneDrinks.com. There is no explanation for the name of the drink. I also have no explanation for why in the world I saved a drink recipe that contains Pernod.

In any case, the cocktail recipe lists Pernod, and also black currant cordial, which I know of as Creme de Cassis. I substituted Chambord, which I figured was just as berry-like, and which I had on hand.

Chambord

Chambord


So here’s the original recipe:

King of Denmark

8 ounces Pernod Absinthe
6 ounces black currant cordial
20 ounces water

Mix together in a pitcher, and add ice. Sounds refreshing, right?

Before I tell you about this cocktail, I wanted to show you what Pernod looks like, in case you’ve never seen it, so I poured it into a measuring cup. Notice it’s green. So, I was a bit confused, because I remember Pernod as being neon yellow.

I poured it into a glass and added about 5 parts water, which is the classic way to make the drink, and it still looked different. The drink I remember was a cloudy yellow, and looked like it might contain radiation. This stuff was still on the greenish side.


So I did a little research online, and realized that I hadn’t purchased the original Pernod, sometimes called Pernod Classic, or Pernod Paris, or Pernod Ricard. It’s confusing.

Instead, I had purchased Pernod Absinthe, which has a touch of the herb in it that used to be in real Absinthe, which was banned in France in 1915. Everyone thought that the herb caused hallucinations, but it turns out that Absinthe was extremely alcoholic.

I also read that the luminous yellow color was from food coloring, which has since been removed. Here is a photo of Pernod “Classic.”

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Here’s something else I discovered. Pernod Classic is 40% alcohol. Pernod Absinthe is 68% alcohol!

Ironically, this King of Denmark drink actually uses the Absinthe version of Pernod, which I had accidentally purchased and have had for god knows how many years gathering dust.

The drink really doesn’t have a pretty color, does it? Probably because it’s a mix of green and pink liqueurs.

Then I made the cocktail with the ratio switched. It was definitely much prettier. but still terrible.
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I also added a few raspberries to enhance the raspberriness.
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Unfortunately for me, the Pernod flavor was still too strong and pungent for me. And then finding out after the fact that the Pernod I had used was that alcoholic, it’s no wonder I really disliked this cocktail!

I think I’ll quit experimenting with Pernod of any kind.

Cranberry Vodka

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I’ve made cranberry liqueur before – I mean, you have to for the holidays. It’s so pretty! But, I’ve never made a cranberry vodka before. And, I’ve never used cooked cranberries in a liqueur, either. So when I saw this recipe, I knew I had to try it.

The recipe belongs to Michael Chiarello, and I found it on www.foodnetwork.com. So here’s the recipe, although I’m going to type it up differently, because there’s a definitely mistake in it:

Cranberry Vodka

1 pound cranberries
1 cup sugar
1 vanilla bean or 2 teaspoons vanilla extract (I used the bean, split, with the seeds removed)
1 bottle of vodka (his recipe says 1 bottle of tonic!)

Place the cranberries, sugar and vanilla in a medium saucepan. Place pan over medium heat and stir. Simmer cranberry mixture until the berries burst, about 5 to 6 minutes.

Divide mixture in half and pour into large, clean mason jars. Pour vodka into the jars to cover the berries. Set aside and allow to sit for 1 week. After 1 week, strain out the cranberries and store cranberry vodka in a clean jar in the refrigerator.

To serve: Pour 2 ounces of vodka mixture over ice in a tall glass and top with tonic. Garnish with a slice of lime. I plan on using the cranberry vodka in a vodka tonic, or add cream to it for a creamy cranberry martini!

note: This vodka is very sweet. The next time I use this recipe, I’m going to cut the sugar in half.