Greek Pork and Beans

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We had quite the cold spell a while back, so I during it I felt the need to make a one-pot, stick-to-your-ribs kind of stew. And what better cuisine from which to choose than Greek. It’s often the direction I take for satisfying and comforting dishes, like pastitsio and moussaka.

For these times, I refer to an old cookbook, called Flavors of Greece, published in 1991, and authored by Rosemary Barron. And in it I found exactly what I was looking for – a Greek version of pork and beans.

The beans in this dish are giant white Lima beans, and the meat includes pork shoulder, bacon, and sausage.

The bean and pork components are layered, then topped with a thick bread crumb and Parmesan crust. Oddly enough, it reminds me of a giant cassoulet!

Here’s the recipe.

Traditional Pork and Bean Casserole
Khirino´ Khoria´tiko

1 1/2 pounds dried butter beans, soaked overnight
3 pounds boneless lean pork shoulder
1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1/4 cup diced pastourma´s ham or bacon
3 cups chopped onion
3 large cloves garlic, finely chopped
1 cup red wine
2 pounds tomatoes, peeled, diced, juices reserved
1 teaspoon honey
1/4 cup dried oregano
2 tablespoons ground coriander
5 whole cloves
4 juniper berries, lightly crushed
1/2 cup chopped parsley
Salt
1 tablespoon cracked black pepper
1 – 1 1/2 cups meat stock
1/2 country sausages
1 cup fresh whole-wheat bread crumbs
1/4 cup kasse´ri cheese or Parmesan

Cook and drain the soaked beans. I cooked mine in chicken stock. Set aside.

Cut the pork into 1” cubes. Heat 3 tablespoons of olive oil in a heavy skillet and lightly brown half the meat over medium heat. Repeat with the remaining meat.



Add the bacon and sauté 2-3 minutes. Add the onion and sauté, stirring occasionally, until light golden brown, about 15 minutes.

Add the garlic, cook 1 minute longer, and add the red wine. Bring to a boil and boil a minute or two, then stir in the tomatoes with their juices, honey, oregano, coriander, cloves, juniper berries, parsley, salt, and pepper.

Simmer until the liquid is reduced by half. Add 1 cup of the stock and simmer 5 minutes longer.

Add the meat, cover, reduce the heat, and simmer 30 minutes longer; add stock if there appears to be less than 2 cups of sauce. Season to taste. The sauce should be highly flavored.

Heat the oven to 325 degrees F. Slice the sausages into 1/2” thick slices and combine with the beans.

Sprinkle 2 tablespoons olive oil over the bottom of a heavy casserole and cover with one third of the sausages and beans. Cover with a layer of half the meat mixture, then half the remaining beans, then the remaining meat. Top with a layer of the remaining beans.

With the back of a wooden spoon, gently press down on the beans so some of the sauce rises to the surface.

Sprinkle the bread crumbs and cheese on top.

Sprinkle with the remaining olive oil, cover, and bake 45 minutes.

Reduce the oven temperature to 300 degrees F and bake 1 1/2 hours longer, until a golden crust has formed.

Remove the casserole lid and bake 10 minutes, or until the crust is deep golden brown.

I let the casserole sit for at least 45 minutes, without the lid, before serving.

Even though I used a large/wide Le Creuset for this casserole, it was so thick I wasn’t sure how to serve it up!


For the sake of this post, I cut out a square so the layers would show.

The casserole is quite stunning. And the flavors are just what you’d expect. Tomatoes, herbs, meat – a lovely, rustic meal.

And the meat is extremely tender.

Note: The recipe also included dried marjoram and winter savory — neither of which I had.

White Bean and Tomato Salad

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Beans, beans, beans. The more I eat, the more I’m addicted! I really love making beans from scratch, because still love the idea of creating meals for pennies. And a pot of beans can be turned into multiple meals.

But I’ve also touted my loved of canned beans on this blog – especially canned Great Northern beans for making my white bean dips. And I love canned black beans, because they make fabulous black bean salads, or a quick black bean dip. So I keep canned beans on hand always.

Today I’m going to show you how simple and easy it is to make a bean salad – this time using Navy Beans, priced at $1.19 per can.

But what’s even better than canned beans being inexpensive, is that they’re extremely healthy, and can be dressed up however you want! Black beans lend themselves beautifully to Mexican and Southwestern dishes, but for me, personally, I keep my white beans for Mediterranean-inspired salads.

They can be a healthy and hearty side dish, or make a whole meal. And, they’re good year ’round, depending on the ingredients.

So today I’m making a navy bean salad with tomatoes, and topping it with capers, shallots, and chives, because chives have returned to my garden. You can add oregano or basil, or anything you want to this salad. That’s the fun of playing with bean salads! Enjoy!


Navy Bean Salad

2 – 16 ounce cans navy beans, well drained
1 container cherry tomatoes
1-2 shallots, diced
Capers, drained
Chives, chopped, or parsley if you prefer
Olive oil and vinegar, or a basic vinaigrette*

Place the drained beans in a medium-sized bowl.
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Slice the cherry tomatoes in half lengthwise and let them hang out on a paper towel to drain a bit.
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Add the amount of vinaigrette you want to the beans and give them a toss. Right before serving add the tomatoes and stir them in gently.
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Place the beans in individual serving bowls; 2 cans should make 4 servings unless this salad will be a whole meal.


Sprinkle the bean salad with shallots, capers, and the chives. Feta cheese would also be a wonderful topping, but I kept this salad cheese-less today!

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Alternatively, you could add all of the ingredients together in the salad. I was looking for a more purely bean and tomato salad, with some toppings.


Taste for seasoning, especially salt and black pepper.

Serve at room temperature.

* My home-made vinaigrettes tend to be about half vinegar and half olive oil. I often add fresh garlic, and maybe some Dijon mustard, plus I always add salt. That’s it. I love vinegar with bean salads, and tend to use lemon or lime juice-based dressings with grain salads for some reason. But you could certainly substitute lemon juice for vinegar in this case. Use what you love!

note: If money is an issue for you, keep your eye on bean prices. Where I live, Cannelini beans cost twice as much as Great Northerns, and Frijoles Negros cost twice as much as black beans. They’re just considered and treated more “gourmet” with the foreign names!