King of Denmark

22 Comments

I’ve been saving this cocktail recipe for a while, even though it contains Pernod.
forsythia
I don’t remember why I even have Pernod in my liquor cabinet, because I don’t like it. I drank it once in a village in Provence, while sitting on a rooftop watching the sun set. I managed to choke the stuff down because I felt I had to. I wanted that experience, like the times I choked down whiskey in Ireland and Scotland, and Grappa in Italy. But it was awful.

My mother was never much of a drinker for being French, but occasionally she would get out her Pernod, mix it with water, and enjoy it during the summer months. I could hardly get past the smell of the stuff – the pungent anise flavor.

Pernod Absinthe

Pernod Absinthe


So the recipe I’d saved, called the King of Denmark I discovered at BarNoneDrinks.com. There is no explanation for the name of the drink. I also have no explanation for why in the world I saved a drink recipe that contains Pernod.

In any case, the cocktail recipe lists Pernod, and also black currant cordial, which I know of as Creme de Cassis. I substituted Chambord, which I figured was just as berry-like, and which I had on hand.

Chambord

Chambord


So here’s the original recipe:

King of Denmark

8 ounces Pernod Absinthe
6 ounces black currant cordial
20 ounces water

Mix together in a pitcher, and add ice. Sounds refreshing, right?

Before I tell you about this cocktail, I wanted to show you what Pernod looks like, in case you’ve never seen it, so I poured it into a measuring cup. Notice it’s green. So, I was a bit confused, because I remember Pernod as being neon yellow.

I poured it into a glass and added about 5 parts water, which is the classic way to make the drink, and it still looked different. The drink I remember was a cloudy yellow, and looked like it might contain radiation. This stuff was still on the greenish side.


So I did a little research online, and realized that I hadn’t purchased the original Pernod, sometimes called Pernod Classic, or Pernod Paris, or Pernod Ricard. It’s confusing.

Instead, I had purchased Pernod Absinthe, which has a touch of the herb in it that used to be in real Absinthe, which was banned in France in 1915. Everyone thought that the herb caused hallucinations, but it turns out that Absinthe was extremely alcoholic.

I also read that the luminous yellow color was from food coloring, which has since been removed. Here is a photo of Pernod “Classic.”

54dae2173a8d8_-_absinthe-0808-lg
Here’s something else I discovered. Pernod Classic is 40% alcohol. Pernod Absinthe is 68% alcohol!

Ironically, this King of Denmark drink actually uses the Absinthe version of Pernod, which I had accidentally purchased and have had for god knows how many years gathering dust.

The drink really doesn’t have a pretty color, does it? Probably because it’s a mix of green and pink liqueurs.

Then I made the cocktail with the ratio switched. It was definitely much prettier. but still terrible.
per99
I also added a few raspberries to enhance the raspberriness.
per

Unfortunately for me, the Pernod flavor was still too strong and pungent for me. And then finding out after the fact that the Pernod I had used was that alcoholic, it’s no wonder I really disliked this cocktail!

I think I’ll quit experimenting with Pernod of any kind.

Claret Cup

23 Comments

Recently I was talking to my husband and mentioned that I thought it was silly for food bloggers to post about smoothies. I mean, you really don’t need a recipe for a smoothie, and besides – it’s just a drink.

And then he reminded me that I post cocktails on my blog. Touché! But, in my defense – they’re cocktails. They’re important. We don’t drink smoothies when it’s five o’clock somewhere.

So this recipe is for a cocktail called a Claret Cup I’m using from this Gourmet compendium cookbook.
claret6

I googled the name claret cup because I had a feeling it was a very old-fashioned drink, and indeed it is. It was fashionable in England in the 1800’s, in fact. Furthermore, according to this fabulous website, called The Art of Drink, there is a “striking resemblance” to Pimm’s Cup, which I made here on my blog.

The drink eventually made it to the U.S., then died down in popularity. Maybe I’ll start a new trend?

The recipe in the Best of Gourmet cookbook calls for 2 bottles of wine. Specifically, claret. Since I was only making the drink for two, I opted for 2 cups of wine, and adjusted the recipe accordingly. I hope. Unfortunately, unless I make the punch for a crowd, I’ll never quite know what it’s supposed to taste like.

I chose a Shiraz, but tasted it on its own and was not impressed. If you don’t like inferior wine, don’t buy this Layer Cake Shiraz.

claret1

Claret Cup

2 cups red wine, preferably from the Bordeaux region of France
1 1/2 ounces orange liqueur
1 1/2 ounces crème de cassis
1 ounce ruby port (the original recipe listed tawny port)
1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice
1 teaspoon sweetened lime juice, purchased
Bubbly water

claret7

In a small pitcher, pour in the red wine. Then add the orange liqueur and crème de cassis. Measure the port and add that to the wine mixture.
claret8
Then stir in the lemon juice and sweetened lime juice. Stir and taste. You could always add some superfine sugar if you think it’s not sweet enough, or a little more port.

Pour some into and glass and top with bubbly water of your choice. San Pellegrino comes to mind, but I used bubbly water made from my Sodastream machine. I used about 2/3 wine mixture and 1/3 bubbly water.
claret5
Serve with a slice of lemon.
claret4
Alternatively, chill the wine mixture and the bubbly water first, and then serve cold, or forget the bubbly water and just serve this over ice. It would be very refreshing this way.

claret

verdict: This claret cup is very different in flavor from a Pimm’s cup, but there are some sweet and fruity similarities. Using this recipe exactly, I thought it came out really well – more like a sangria – because it’s essentially sweetened wine. You could really play with the liqueurs and make it more raspberry using Chambord, or make it more orange using Grand Marnier or another orange liqueur. But this drink is good. I seriously wouldn’t make it as a punch, just because of the spillage potential of this really red drink!