Pork All’Arrabbiata

The other day I read an email from New York Times Cooking, What to Cook this Weekend, by Sam Sifton, that I only occasionally read. I say occasionally, because I dislike the format of the highly-packed food and cooking info in the emails. But a photo caught my eye so I read on.

I’m probably in the minority, but I think Sam Sifton must be an arrogant man. Or maybe he’s just too smart for me, but I would bet he’s someone who likes the sound of his own voice.

According to Wikipedia, “Sam Sifton is the food editor of The New York Times, the founding editor of NYT Cooking and a columnist for The New York Times Magazine. He has also served as the national editor, the restaurant critic and the culture editor.”

Okay, so he does know a few things. But he still seems show-off to me.

Mr. Sifton has a cookbook out, called “See You on Sunday.” It’s about Sunday meals, and has high reviews. Some reviewers suggest that the book is for novice cooks, and I’d have to agree. In the chicken section, are Tuscan chicken, chicken Milanese, beer can chicken, chicken paprika, chicken Provençal, chicken Shawarma… there’s just nothing new or exceptional.

The recipe in the email that caught my attention in the NYT Cooking email, from 2-21-2020, was braised pork All’Arrabbiata, by Ali Slagle. According to the recipe’s information, “this spicy pork shoulder’s long-simmered flavor is one you’ll crave all season long.”

Ut’s basically pulled pork, but instead of barbecue sauce, it’s cooked in a spicy red sauce. I served it as sandwiches. Delicious.

I substituted prepared Arrabiatta sauce for the fire-roasted tomatoes listed, but a good marinara like my Marinara would work just as well.

I also didn’t use wine. See printable recipe below for original recipe.

Braised Pork All’Arrabbiata
slightly adapted

3 pounds boneless pork shoulder, trimmed of more than 1/4″ fat
Kosher salt and black pepper
2 tablespoons extra-virgin oil
10 garlic cloves, peeled and smashed
1 1/2 teaspoons cayenne chile pepper flakes
42 ounces Arrabiatta or marinara sauce

Heat the oven to 350 degrees. Season the pork all over with 2 teaspoons salt and 1 teaspoon pepper.

In a large Dutch oven, heat the olive oil over medium-high. Add the pork shoulder and sear until browned on all sides, 8 – 10 minutes.

Reduce the heat to medium-low. Add the garlic and cayenne flakes to the oil and stir to combine. Add the marinara sauce, season with salt and pepper as necessary, then bring to a boil over medium-high heat.

Cover, then transfer to the oven and cook until the pork falls apart when prodded with a fork, 3 hours.

Working directly in the pot, use two forks to shred the meat into long, bite-sized pieces. Stir the pork into the tomato sauce until it’s evenly distributed.

This lucious pork can be served in quite a few ways. As a sauce over pasta, served over polenta, or as sandwiches, similar to how you’d serve meatball subs.

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I added grated mozzarella and Parmesan to the sandwiches before heating.

I thought these were way more fun than meatball subs, personally.

On another day, I prepared polenta and served the pork on top. That was also wonderful!

 

 

40 thoughts on “Pork All’Arrabbiata

  • I recently heard an interview with him on Fresh Air. That pork would be very versatile. Make a good Sunday gravy! :)

  • Mimi, I try to learn something from know-it-all chefs (including an obnoxious daytime TV “celebrity chef” who shall remain nameless, but I think we feel the same way about her!) Sometimes you need to get past the messenger to get the message — or next great meal. Looks like you succeeded! (Love your polenta option, too.)

    • Good advice. But I’m still put off by know-it-all-y people. And maybe it’s the format. And maybe he has no choice in the format. But I do love this recipe, and I will be making it again.

    • Oh, you’ll love it! It’s really a brilliant recipe. Much better than barbecued pull pork, but that’s just me!

  • Sounds/looks incredibly hearty and delicious! I do like the NY Times Food Section, but I’m not familiar with Sam Sifton. Your “review” of him made me chuckle, though. :-) ~Valentina

    • Well, I should probably keep my opinions to myself, but he is a public person, and one who just rubs me the wrong way. And, I could be totally wrong about him… This recipe, although not his, is really wonderful. You would love it.

    • Ain’t that the truth?!! I’ve been really proud of myself lately – I’ve been really good about not snacking. For once I’m not gaining! I’m not sure I’ve ever had matzo… but it doesn’t seem like a decent substitute for real bread! Happy Easter!

  • Don’t keep your opinions to yourself, please ! They are my reason to love you so much ! It is always so much easier to connect to opened people, don’t you think ? You always know where they stand, us included, right ? And, yes, I love Pork All’Arrabbiata. Printed already I wish you have Peaceful and Happy Easter dear Mimi :-)

  • Recipe sounds delicious, love your pics, and you NOT keeping your opinions to yourself is, I believe, one of the reasons we all like to visit here :-)

    • Ha! Okay well good!!! I have been accused of being quite opinionated, but it’s not always in a negative way! Stay safe Kiki!

  • I subscribe to those emails too and admittedly I usually end up deleting them without even having a look. I can see why this one caught your attention, though. I bet these sandwiches were delish.

    • They really were good. The photo is what got me, cause I really don’t enjoy reading through the paragraphs with endless links…

  • The pork sounds quite good. The emails from The NYTimes also drive me crazy, I feel like I need to shout, “calm down!” when their emails come into my box. Though I much pref Sam to Melissa (I know this is not a popular opinion). She seems like the know-it-all to me, and there is zero subtlety to her recipes! Rant over. As soon as I get a pork shoulder, I am making this pork.

    • Ha! I love that you have the same opinion! Now, I must have missed Melissa emails, cause I can’t place her! Maybe there’s a format prescribed by The NY Times that they must adhere to? I dunno. It’s just intense. This pork is fabulous.

    • That’s how I have to be with most everything – lamb, octopus, liver…. so I understand! It’s silly to cook for one in a family of two!

  • I definitely don’t like the snootiness that goes around in some food circles. Although, I have to laugh at my own snootiness all the time. I often think the 16-year-old version of me would find the current version of me quite a snob. But in the end, good food is good food, and I’m glad you found some! I don’t get the NYT emails, but I do peruse that section of the site frequently.

    • I wrote a post years ago called, I think, “On Being a Food Snob.” I wrote that I’m not snobby about people who like bad food, but I am snobby about food. And there’s a good reason for that!

  • This looks absolutely delicious and easy! I love that you made it into a sandwich. Over polenta sounds good too.

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