Figgy Jam

61 Comments

Figgy Jam! Just the name alone conjures Christmas spirit! And it’s December – time to plan cheese pairings!

Personally, I think a jam, paste, or curd is a wonderful addition to a cheese platter, because it enhances the cheese. This one has a little savory component to it, but it’s not a chutney. And, it’s really not a jam, because it’s not that sweet.


Just as the Spaniards are so good at pairing their beloved Manchego with quince paste, I make my figgy “jam” to pair with cheeses like Chèvre, Brie, and my favorite stinky cheese of all time – the famous Époisses from the Burgundy region of France.

I love dried figs, but I have to admit something. When I eat a dense fig jam, it can sometimes feel like I’m chewing sand because of the seeds. So to the figs, I added dates and dried cranberries. That way, I will have the figgy flavor, but not so many seeds.

And the cranberries provide a more scarlet color, which fits the holidays.
So here’s what I did:

Figgy Jam

1 pound dried fruit – chopped figs, chopped dates, and dried cranberries
1 apple, peeled, cored, finely diced
¾ cup fresh orange juice
¼ cup ruby Port
2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
2 shallots, finely diced
1/3 cup brown sugar
1 cinnamon stick

On a scale, weigh out the fruit you’re using – in this case, figs, dates, and dried cranberries.

Place all of the ingredients in a pot including the cinnamon stick.

Cook the mixture with the lid on for about 30 minutes over medium-low heat, stirring often.

Pretty much all of the liquid will have been absorbed; you want the dried fruit hydrated, but also have a little liquid left over in order to process the jam.

Let the mixture cool. Remove the cinnamon stick, then put the mixture in a food processor. Pulse, scrape, pulse, scape, and continue, using a little more orange juice if necessary. I don’t make a paste – I prefer to have a little texture.

Place in jars and store in the refrigerator. Alternately, freeze the jars and thaw in the refrigerator before serving.

The jam is best at room temperature served with a variety of cheeses, crackers, breads, and more dried fruits!

There are brie logs that would make lovely canapés.

Also, the figgy jam could be put on a brie wheel of any size, warmed slightly. Then you get the combination of oozing cheese and the figgy jam.


I drizzled a little maple syrup over the brie as well.

The jam is also good with goat cheese.

However you use it, you will love the combination.

The figgy jam isn’t terribly sweet, so it’s also good on toast in the morning!

61 thoughts on “Figgy Jam

  1. This would be delicious with foie gras too

    Have you changed something re your site? I can no longer like anything and each time I want to leave a comment I have to input my name, email and ensuite!

  2. So bring us some figgy pudding… I kept singing this as I read your post this morning :) Love your figgy jam and the thought of pairing that with all those beautiful cheeses you mention, wow! You certainly are in the Christmas spirit aren’t you? Hey, I was checking to see why my site does not have the snowflakes that WP had each December (yours does)? So I contacted them, and they informed me that you are on the business plan and probably used a plug-in, as WP does not do that anymore. Is that correct?

    • I did use a plug-in, because my snow didn’t start falling on December 1st like it always did. I was notified by WP recently that I needed to pay for the next year of my business plan, but I’d never chosen a business plan, so we went back and forth for days. They tried to undo it, because it was obvious to them that I was indeed not a business. I don’t even low ads. But they couldn’t do it, so they just told me they would re-charge me. God knows what’s going to happen next December. Of course they say I chose the business plan.

      • When I asked them about the snow falling, WP informed me that they stopped doing that. So I asked how come some of the other bloggers have it? They asked me to send examples, so I sent yours and Judi’s. They told me you both had business plans. So I asked what the difference was, and they sent it to me. Basically I have a premium plan, that I switched from a basic plan and it looks like I’ll have to soon pay for a business plan, as it has unlimited storage, (and mine is running out). It is kinda annoying actually, because that is the one reason I switched to premium as I thought it was unlimited pictures, but that’s not the case I see. I don’t own a business either and I don’t have ads all over my posts. It’s just as basic as can be, and so is Judi’s. So not quite sure what they are on about. How do you use a plug-in?

      • Oh, interesting. Honestly I don’t even remember going to premium, but I’ll have a storage issue also. Doesn’t seem fair. It’s expensive! Loretta, I’m visiting my mother (90!) and I’ll be back Friday. But I’m pretty sure on the WP dashboard there is an actual link for plug-ins. I looked for a new one, and installed that, but then also noticed that my regular was in the plug-in list, and just needed to be activated. So yours is probably there also. In order to be more specific i need to be in front of my computer. Please bug me if I end up forgetting about this. I’m not expert, but I’m happy to help with what I can.

      • I think you have to have a business plan to avoid the ads (which I hate). I signed up for the business plan but I also don’t intend to commercialize. I really dislike (HATE!) the blogs with ads popping up all over the place, especially the ones that pop up in the middle of reading text.

      • Not only pop up but block text, as you to re-follow, confuse me to the point that I don’t know what is blog and what are ads and videos…

  3. You’re right about the seeds — they’re a bit annoying. Good idea for how to cope. Great recipe — this would be wonderful with cheese. Or all by itself. :-)

  4. I love figs, especially fresh ones. Great idea placing the fig jam on top of the warmed brie- I could eat the whole thing in one sitting!

  5. I need to track down some figs and make this Chef Mimi – the fig season is so short here in Australia and it would be such a lovely way to preserve them….happy Christmas feasting!

  6. Mimi, in my opinion, a cheese plate isn’t complete without fig jam. I’m not a seed person either, so your blend of dates, figs, and cranberry sounds lovely. A must make for our Christmas cheese course.

    • Thanks, Ron. I was also trying to improve the color of the jam, although it didn’t do much! I’ve gotten way more into pairing condiments with cheeses in the last decade or so. I remember having a blue cheese with lemon curd at a restaurant once, and it changed my life!

  7. Looks lovely. I adore dried fruits of any kind, especially in the colder months.

    By the way I’m having the same issue as one of your other commenters, having to sign in manually each time. (Also on a number of other websites. Issue began recently for me.)

    • When I’m on my iPad, it seems like I always have to sign in, even if I’m already signed in to WP. At my computer it’s much better. I wish I knew what to even look up!

  8. I SO love that it’s not too sweet. In fact, I adore fruit and dried fruit with sharp cheese (oh, and I add nuts, nut butters, and chocolate). It’s such an exquisite combination. Three cheers! Flavor compound mixing certainly doesn’t get the attention it deserves :-)

  9. Hello there. Figs are one of those foods that I didn’t start appreciating until I was well into my adulthood. Ditto for beets. It’s interesting how our tastes sometimes change/evolve over the years. A happy 2019 to you and yours.

    Neil Scheinin

  10. This looks beautiful. Époisses is my favorite too. In fact I was at Murray’s cheese just this morning and considered buying a wheel. I usually buy it when it get marked down to $10. Today it was full price and I passed. Had I seen this post before I went to the market I would have bought that cheese at $20 as well as the dried figs for your figgy jam (Murray’s carries both!). Oh well the holidays are still young… GREG

  11. Now my guests have all gone, I’m enjoying catching up on reading the blogs that I have been missing. I love the sound of this one Mimi! I make quince paste when we have them in season. Due to the high sugar content it usually lasts until the following season (I make a lot). This is a great alternative which I’m sure everyone will enjoy. I particularly like this sort of condiment with Blue Cheese 😋

    • Thanks, Kathryn! I do love membrillo, but typically I like cheese pairings that aren’t overly sweet. Hope you’re doing well!

  12. I made some figgy type jam back in november when i made my cheese/meat platter but was not happy with it – It was just too sweet and sticky. I’m making yours next year. I think the apples are the perfect thing to add and would have helped my jam out – mine just got so solid. Yours is so lovely and that brie! My mouth is watering!

    • Sorry, just found this comment! Well, I personally don’t like anything too sweet with cheese, but this isn’t a chutney either. Just a bit of savory with sweet. Hope you like it!

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