Sik Sik Wat

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In Ethiopia, the word wat is basically the word for stew. But this is no ordinary stew. The Ethiopian wats, no matter what meat is used, whether cooked or raw, are spicy, saucy stews of vibrant color and endless flavors.

This stew is a classic example of a wat. I hope you get a chance to make it!

Sik Sik Wat
Beef Stewed in Red Pepper Sauce

To serve 6 to 8

2 cups finely chopped onions
1/3 cup niter kebbeh
2 teaspoons finely chopped garlic
1 teaspoon minced ginger root
1/4 ground fenugreek
1/8 teaspoon ground cloves
1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/4 cup paprika
2 tablespoons berberé
2/3 cup dry red wine
1/2 cup water
1 large tomato, coarsely chopped and pureed through a food mill (I used a teaspoon of tubal tomato paste)
2 teaspoons salt
3 pounds lean boneless beef, preferably chuck, trimmed of excess fat and cut into 1-inch cubes
Freshly ground black pepper

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In a heavy 4- to 5- quart enameled casserole, cook the onions over moderate heat for 5 or 6 minutes, until they are soft and dry. Don’t let them burn.

Stir in the niter kebbeh and, when it begins to plutter, add the garlic, ginger, fenugreek, cloves, allspice, and nutmeg, stirring well after each addition.

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Add the paprika and berbere, and stir over low heat for 2 to 3 minutes.

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Stir in the wine, water, pureed tomato and salt, and bring the liquid to a boil.

height=”442″ class=”aligncenter size-large wp-image-8040″ />In Ethiopia, the word wat is basically the word for stew. But this is no ordinary stew. The Ethiopian wats, no matter what meat is used, are spicy, saucy stews of vibrant color and endless flavors.

Add the beef cubes and turn them about with a spoon until they are evenly coated with the sauce.

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Then reduce the heat to low. Cover the pan partially and simmer the beef for about 1 1/2 hours. Sprinkle the wat with a few grindings of pepper and taste for seasoning.

sik4Sik sik wat is traditionally accompanied by injera or yewollo ambasha (recipe coming soon), but may also be eaten with Arab-style flat bread or hot boiled rice. Yegomen kitfo and/or plain yoghurt may be served with the wat from separate bowls.

29 thoughts on “Sik Sik Wat

  1. love it! love anything ethiopian… do you think it i possible to buy berbere’ rather than making it? loved the post on the making but I can’t wait to try the stew. and your new layout is gorgeous!!!

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  2. Cooked with love and spices. Sounds delicious. I would love to see a photo shot of all of your spices. I think you are like me as we cook so many international cuisines I essentially I have and entire large cabinet dedicated to spices and herbs and condiments.

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    • I have two drawers, a spice cabinet, and a pantry with spices and whatnot. It’s crazy! Then two cupboards with bottles and jars of stuff, then there’s the refrigerator…..

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  3. We had our first Ethipoian meal last week Mimi, thanks for sparking our interest! We loved every mouthful. I’ll try this soon. We can buy berbere dry spice mix in good food outlets, in Australia, or online from Herbies. Look forward to the injera recipe. 😃

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  4. I’ve been waiting to see what you were going to do with your spice mix! That’s so funny about your jars and spice cabinets. I just had to buy a bunch of jars to catch the overflow. Next I’d love to see you try your hand at that wonderful bread that goes with it!

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